Have you ever setup a slackline and found that your anchor slings were either too long, too short, or just did not sit right on the trees you are using? Well, I'm here to tell you that those days are long gone! We have just introduced an all new Adjustable Anchor Webbing that you can use on just about any size tree in a variety of configurations. This new sling material is incredibly versatile and can be used for slacklines up to 1000 feet!

Adjustable Anchor Webbing

As mentioned above, these slings have a variety of configurations that make them unique. I would like to go through a few of these configurations below and mention a few others that I won't go into much detail about.

First, I would like to highlight the reason why this new sling material is so versatile is due to the anchor holes that are woven into it every few inches. These anchor holes are an integral part of the weave and are actually individually rated! That means that you can clip into every single one of them and have a rated anchor point! This allows for some very interesting configurations that aren't possible on any other type of sling.

 

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Vertical Pull

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Vertical Pull

As mentioned above, the anchor holes on the Adjustable Anchor Webbing are rated. If you clip a carabiner or shackle to opposing anchor holes and use the sling in the vertical pull configuration, this will have the following rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 780 lbf (3.47 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 3,900 (17.35 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 1 foot

 

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Choker Hitch

Sometimes you need a way to rig your primitive slacklines in a way that does not tri-load the carabiners. This can be difficult without needed additional hardware to connect your carabiner too, often adding weight to your whole kit. Well, with the Adjustable Anchor Webbing you can do a simple choker hitch, but clip the anchor loops from both strands to create a variable length connection point that does not tri-load the carabiner. This configuration has the following capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 600 lbf (2.67 kN) - UNTESTED
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 3,000 (13.35 kN) - UNTESTED
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 1 foot

 

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Basket

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Basket

Using the same anchor hole technique from above and you wrap it around a tree as your anchor sling, clipping both anchor holes to the same carabiner or shackle, you will have a great sling that can get really snug up against the tree and is fully adjustable by choosing different rigging holes. This configuration has the following rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 1,560 lbf (6.94 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 7,800 (34.70 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 1 foot

 

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Wrap Around Tree

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Wrap Around Tree

If instead of connecting both ends to the master point like in the above example, we connected both ends together with a single carabiner or shackle after going around the tree, we will have an easy to rig sling that go straight to a vertical rigging plate, or any other gear that has a big anchor hole. This configuration has the following rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 1,300 lbf (5.78 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 6,500 (28.91 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 1 foot

 

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Folded Basket

Anchor Loop to Anchor Loop - Folded Basket

If you plan on rigging a slightly bigger line or are taking your line to higher tensions, it is advantageous to fold the Anchor Sling Webbing in half and use it in the folded basket configuration. place the folded section on your master point connector (should be a shackle for higher loads) and wrap the two strands around the tree. Now connect an anchor loop from both strands to your shackle as close to the tree as possible. This will give you a double-strand basket around the tree with considerably higher working load limits, as seen below:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 3,120 lbf (13.88 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 15,600 (69.40 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - 2x Sling length + 1 foot

 

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Vertical Pull

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Vertical Pull

One of the coolest features of this new sling material is the ability to weave it through itself to create a Full Strength Loop! This is such a nice thing to have! By passing the sling through itself 4 times (this is the magic number, anything less will absolutely not work), you can have an attachment point that is the same strength as the webbing itself. To do this, simply fold the sling where you need the attachment point to be, then weave the tail through 4 successive anchors and tie an overhand knot at the end. If you make this loop large enough, you can even adjust the size of it! Here are the rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 2,000 lbf (8.90 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 10,000 (44.48 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 3 feet

 

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Choker Hitch

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Choker Hitch

Using these same woven loops, you can also do a choker hitch. I wouldn't recommend using this method as there are several other methods that are FAR stronger and easier to rig than this that will offer more adjustability. This is just for reference. Here are the rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - UNTESTED
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - UNTESTED
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 4 feet

 

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Basket

Woven Loop to Woven Loop - Basket

For a really strong and easy to build configuration, try the woven basket! Simply create a woven loop on either end of the sling and wrap around your tree / anchor point. This will give you some serious strength and also full adjustability. I would be weary of using this method on soft bark trees under high loads though due to the focused pressure points (1" webbing). If you want serious strength plus no damage of harming the tree, try the double woven loop method. Here are the rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 4,000 lbf (17.79 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 20,000 (88.97 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 3 feet

 

Woven Loop Wrap

I really like this configuration for wrapping around the tree and passing through vertically oriented hardware. Simply wrap the webbing around the tree and weave both ends through each other 4 times (for a total of 8 weaves) to have a nice loop around the tree. Make sure you pass one end through your hardware first before weaving to avoid having to redo the weave. Here are the rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - UNTESTED
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - UNTESTED
  • Length of Material Needed - Sling length + 3 feet

 

Woven Loop Basket

Woven Loop Basket

If you create a woven loop before putting your sling around the tree by weaving both ends together 4 times each (for a total of 8 weaves), you can have a solid loop that you can use as a basket sling around your tree. This is useful for bigger lines that require a bunch of tension. Here are the rated capacities:

  • Working Load Limit (WLL) - 8,000 lbf (35.59 kN)
  • Minimum Breaking Strength (MBS) - 40,000 lbf (177.94 kN)
  • Length of Material Needed - 2x Sling length + 3 feet

 

That's all the configurations I have for now. There are tons more to explore, but I will not go into them in this article. The ones listed above are great for most applications in slacklining.

Thanks for reading!

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